Ancestors of Mandy Willard

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Samuel WOOLGAR (1783-1862)

and Hannah STRINGER (1785-1863)

 

Samuel Woolgar and Hannah Stringer married by banns on 14 October 1806 in West Grinstead, Sussex.  The witnesses to their marriage were George Sargent and Elizabeth Goldsmith.  (They were not my direct ancestors.  Samuel was the nephew of my 5x Great Grandfather, Samuel Woolgar.)

Samuel Woolgar was baptised on 1 January 1784 in West Grinstead.  He was the son of William Woolgar (1745-1825) and Jane Nye (c1750-?).  He died aged 77 years on 3 November 1862 and was buried on 9 November 1862 in West Grinstead.

Hannah Stringer??Hannah Stringer was born about 1785 in West Grinstead.  She died aged 77 years on 5 September 1863 and was buried on 9 September 1863 in West Grinstead.

Thanks to Dave Woolgar for the photograph on the right.  It maybe of Hannah Woolgar, nee Stringer.  See further below for details about how the photograph was dated.

Samuel and Hannah were buried together in West Grinstead churchyard and a headstone to their memory survives.  The stone also commemorates their daughter Sarah and her infant son Charles.

At the time of the 1841 census, Samuel was a 57 year old brickmaker and Hannah was 56.  They were living at Waterlow House in West Grinstead and on census night 30 year old William Downer and 13 year old Samuel Laker were staying with the couple.

In 1851, Samuel was a 66 year old journeyman brickmaker and living with the family of his married daughter Sarah Carman at 13 Mary Street in Bromley, Middlesex.  Hannah was then 66 years old and the head of her household at Brickyard in West Grinstead.  With her on census night were 2 nephews, namely, 22 year old Samuel Laker and 15 year old Albert Woolgar (grandson rather than nephew) who were both agricultural labourers.

At the time of the 1861 census the couple were living together in Worthing Road, West Grinstead.  Samuel was still earning his living as a brickmaker and he was 76 years old.  Hannah was then 75 years old.  The census notes that he was Samuel Woolgar senior and the next household on the enumerators route was that of Samuel Woolgar junior.

 

Samuel Woolgar and Hannah Stringer had 2 known children:

  1. Samuel Woolgar was baptised on 14 April 1807 in West Grinstead.  He died aged 80 years and was buried on 20 September 1887 in West Grinstead.  He died aged 80 years and was buried on 20 September 1887 in West Grinstead.

    Samuel married Rhoda Bristow by banns on 6 June 1835 in Shipley.  He was then from West Grinstead and they were both single.  The witnesses to their marriage were Charles Wood and Sarah Woolgar.  The banns were published in Shipley on 17, 24 and 31 of May 1835.

    Rhoda was born about 1811/2 in Shipley and was the daughter of George Bristow and Sarah Randall.  She died aged 55 years and was buried on 12 May 1867 in West Grinstead.

    When the 1841 census was recorded the couple and their son Albert and 20 year old Edward Linfield were living in Shipley.  Samule was then said to be a 30 year old labourer and Rhoda 25.  Both Samuel and Edward were agricultural labourers.  The 1851 census records that Samuel was a 43 year old agricultural labouer and Rhoda was 39.  They were living at Barhill in Shipley along with their 4 children and Rhoda's parents, 76 year old George and 75 year old Sarah, who had both been born in Shipley.  In 1861 the couple and 4 of their children were living next door to his parents in Worthing Street, West Grinstead.  Samuel was then a 54 year old agricultural labourer and Rhoda was 49.

    Samuel and Rhoda had the following children:

    1. Albert Woolgar was baptised on 14 February 1836 in West Grinstead, at which time his father was a labourer.  He was 5 years old in 1841 and with his parents.  At the time of the 1851 census he was a 15 year old agricultural labourer and staying with his grandmother.  In 1861 he was an unmarried 25 year old agricultural labourer living with his parents.

      Albert married Emma Burns by banns on 2 March 1872 in West Grinstead.  He was then a 36 year old bachelor and brickmaker.  She was a 25 year old spinster and servant.  Their fathers were named as Samuel Woolgar a brickmaker and Edward Burns a writing clerk.  The witnesses to their marriage were Samuel Woolgar and Mary Vinall.

    2. Samuel Woolgar was born in Shipley and baptised on 29 January 1843 in West Grinstead.  He died aged 67 years on 7 April 1910 and was buried in West Grinstead.  He was 8 years old in 1851.  In 1861 he was an 18 year old agricultural labourer living at home.

      Samuel married Mary.

      Mary died aged 62 years on 13 April 1910 and was buried with her husband in West Grinstead.  A headstone to their memory survives.

    3. Emily Woolgar was born in Shipley and baptised on 14 June 1846 in West Grinstead.  In 1851 she was 4 years old.

      Emily married James Bowell by banns on 7 October 1869 in West Grinstead.  He was then a 35 year old bachelor and tailor from Shipley.  She was a 23 year old spinster.  Their fathers were named as Peter Bowell a tailor and Samuel Woolgar a brickmaker.  The witnesses to their marriage were Samuel Woolgar and Caroline Woolgar.

    4. Edwin Woolgar was born in Shipley and baptised on 25 June 1848 in West Grinstead.  In 1851 he was 2 years old.  He was 12 years old when the 1861 census was recorded.

    5. Caroline Woolgar was born in Shipley and baptised on 26 January 1851 in West Grinstead.  At the time of the 1851 census she was 4 months old.  She was 10 years old in 1861.

  2. Sarah Woolgar was born about 1811 in West Grinstead.  She died aged 40 years on 29 October 1851 and was buried in West Grinstead.

    Sarah married James Carman.

    James was born about 1811 in Middlesex.  After Sarah's death, James married Susannah.  She was born about 1817 in Cambridgeshire.

    When the 1851 census was recorded the couple and their 5 children and Sarah's father were living at 13 Mary Street, Bromley.  James was then a 39 year old clerk in a distillery.  Sarah was then also 39 years old.  In 1861, James was a 49 year old licenced victualler living at 25 Old Bailey in the parish of St. Sepulchre in north west London.  With him was his 44 year old wife Susannah, his 2 daughters, married brother-in-law George Long aged 26, married sister-in-law Sarah Long aged 33 and 2 unmarried servants, namely 29 year old Hannah Bentham who was deaf and 21 year old George Haylock.

    James and Sarah had the following children:

    1. Ellen S. Carman was born about 1839 in Bromley.  She was a 12 year old scholar in 1851.

    2. Edwin J. Carman was born about 1841 in Bromley.  He was a 10 year old scholar in 1851.

    3. Harriet Carman was born about 1843 in Bromley.  In 1851 she was an 8 year old scholar.

    4. Amelia Carman was born about 1844/5 in Bromley.  In 1851 she was a 6 year old scholar.  The 1861 census records that she was 17 years old and the eldest of her siblings living at home.

    5. Charles Carman was born on 4 July 1845.  He died aged 11 months on 4 June 1846 and was buried in West Grinstead on 10 June 1846.

    6. Maria F. Carman was born about 1848 in Bromley.  At the time of the 1851 census she was a 3 year old scholar.  In 1861 she was 13 years old.

 

Dave Woolgar came upon Maureen Taylor's web site via Family Tree Magazine and emailed her seeking help in identifying the above photograph, which maybe of Hannah Woolgar, nee Stringer.  The following was Maureen's reply and article which appeared in the online edition of FTM.  Maureen's web site is at http://www.maureentaylor.com/projects.htm

 

Ruffled Up

Dave Woolgarís father left him a legacy of family photos. While the majority of images are unidentified his father did help him annotate a few of them with family relationships like this picture of an elderly woman captioned ďgreat great grandmother born about 1820 in England.Ē  That would make this person Woolgarís 4x grandmother if the caption is correct.  Itís a troublesome photo thatís been bothering him for a couple of years.

Itís no wonder this picture is driving him crazy. If this woman was born in 1820 then her clothing should reflect the styles of the 1890s (estimating that sheís at least 70 years of age based on the deep wrinkles around her cheeks).  Thatís not the case. Her sleeves have a slight fullness to the upper arm, but thatís not enough evidence to conclude itís the 90s. For other photos from the late nineteenth century read past columns http://www.familytreemagazine.com/photos/previouscols.htm

This photo has a lot more in common with a picture featured in my Family Tree Magazine Photo Detective  column (June 2005).  The photo that accompanied that article was an elderly woman posed in a ruffled cap, a full upper sleeved dress and a fur stole. It was a portrait of Judith Simpson, age 74, taken in 1848.

Itís clear from the clothing details that this portrait of an unidentified woman is a lot older than Woolgar thought. Her ruffled cap, known as a day cap, was worn indoors. The bold patterned cotton dress with a shawl collar, woolen shawl, and full upper sleeves dates from the 1830s. Her age combined with clothing clues makes it impossible for her to be born in 1820.  Itís a classic example of an elderly person wearing older clothing.

The photo itself is a copy of a daguerreotype, a style of photography popular from the 1840s through c.1860 in many parts of the world including England. For more examples of daguerreotypes see Joan L. Severaís relatively new book, My Likeness Taken: Daguerrian Portraits in America (Kent State University Press, $65.00). Either the copy photographer or the original daguerreotypist took this fuzzy image. Iíd vote for the latter. This daguerreotypist focused his camera perfectly on the fabric at knee height subsequently blurring the rest of the image. This can happen with auto focus cameras even today when you point at an object in the foreground and the background blurs. The oval shape of the original daguerreotype is still visible in the corners of this portrait. Look closely at the upper corners of the image to see the curve.

If the woman in this photo is 70-80 years old and the image dates from c. 1843 then this woman was born in the period c. 1763-1773. Thatís a few more generations back than Woolgarís father thought making this image a family history treasure. With a time frame and an approximate age, now Woolgar can try to figure out who she is.

Donít forget to check out the new Photo Detective Forum on the Family Tree Magazine website!

http://www.familytreemagazine.com/forum/forums/forum-view.asp?fid=16

 

Dave has also received help from Marion Woolgar, who is sceptical that the photograph is of Hannah, as the lady is wearing a ring and Marion does not think this would suit Hannah's economic situation.

Maybe someone else also has a copy of this photograph and can positively identify the lady, if so, please email me or Dave.

 

STRINGER          WOOLGAR